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Rachel F. Moran

Rachel F. Moran was the 2015-16 William H. Neukom Fellows Research Chair in Diversity and Law and is the Co-Director of "The Future of Latinos in the United States: Law, Opportunity, and Mobility" with Robert L. Nelson. Moran is also dean emerita and the Michael J. Connell Distinguished Professor of Law at UCLA School of Law. Moran was appointed dean of UCLA Law School in 2010.  Prior to her tenure at UCLA, Professor Moran was the Robert D. and Leslie-Kay Raven Professor of Law at UC Berkeley School of Law. From July 2008 to June 2010, Moran served as a founding faculty member of the UC Irvine Law School.

Moran received her A.B. in Psychology with Honors and with Distinction from Stanford University in 1978, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa her junior year. She obtained her J.D. from Yale Law School in 1981, where she was an Editor of the Yale Law Journal.  Following law school, she clerked for Chief Judge Wilfred Feinberg of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit and worked for the San Francisco firm of Heller Ehrman White & McAuliffe.

Moran joined the UC Berkeley law faculty in 1983. From 1993 to 1996 she served as chair of the Chicano/Latino Policy Project at UC Berkeley’s Institute for the Study of Social Change, and in 2003, Moran became the director of the Institute. In 1995, she received the UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award.

Moran has published widely.  Some of her recent scholarship includes: Educational Policy and the Law (with Mark G. Yudof, Betsy Levin, James E. Ryan and Kristi L. Bowman) (5th ed. Cengage 2012); Race Law Stories (with Devon Carbado, Foundation Press, 2008); Interracial Intimacy: The Regulation of Race and Romance (University of Chicago Press, 2001); “Race Law Cases in the American Story (with Devon W. Carbado), in Civil Rights in American Law, History, and Politics (edited by Austin Sarat, Cambridge University Press, 2014). Race Law Cases in the American Story,” (with Devon W. Carbado), in Civil Rights in American Law, History, and Politics 16 (edited by Austin Sarat, Cambridge University Press, 2014); “A New Twist on the One Best System: Structured English Immersion Initiatives, Equal Opportunity, and Freedom to Learn,” in The Miseducation of English Learners: A Tale of Three States and Lessons to be Learned 229 (edited by Grace P. McField, Information Age Publishing, 2014); “Youth Civic Development and Education: A Consensus Report on a Conference,” (co-authored),” Stanford Center on Adolescence (2013); “Untoward Consequences: The Ironic Legacy of Keyes v. School District No. 1,” 90 Denver University Law Review 1209 (2013); “Clark Kerr and Me: The Future of the Public Law School,” 88 Indiana Law Journal 1021 (2013); and “What Counts as Knowledge?: A Reflection on Race, Social Science, and the Law,” 44 Law And Society Review 515 (2010).

Moran is highly active in the legal community. In September 2011, she was appointed by President Obama to serve as a member of the Permanent Committee for the Oliver Wendell Holmes Devise. She was President of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) in 2009. She is a member of the American Law Institute as well as a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation, and she has served on the Executive Committee of the Association of American Law Schools. She sat on the Standing Committee of the Division of Public Education of the American Bar Association, and served on the Executive Board of the Berkeley Law Foundation.  In May 2014, she was selected by American Bar Association (ABA) President James R. Silkenat to serve on the ABA Task Force on the Financing of Legal Education.  In recent years, she was also inducted into the Lincoln Club and the Chancery Club of Los Angeles, and in 2013, she was elected to the Beverly Hills Bar Association’s Board of Governors. 

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