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Meet Our Visiting Scholars: 2022-23

Please use the links on the left-hand side to see information about our past visiting scholars. More information on the ABF's visiting scholar opportunities can be found here

Leslie Abramson

April 2022 - April 2023

Leslie Abramson returns to the American Bar Foundation for her second term as a Visiting Scholar, following an initial period of research from 2017 to 2018. Abramson is a film scholar who holds a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. She has taught law and cinema in the Law and Communications Schools at Loyola University Chicago.

Abramson is currently researching representations of the law in silent American cinema. Her work investigates how these original moving images of the legal system indoctrinated a largely unacquainted public, including a surging immigrant population, in American law and its workings. These visual narratives, she shows, judged the law, the legal system’s processes and practitioners, and the association among the citizenry, domestic law, and still consequential societal issues in ways that continue to inform legal representations today.

Abramson is the author, most recently, of Hitchcock and the Anxiety of Authorship (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) and a contributor to Hitchcock and Adaptation (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014), American Cinema of the 1960s (Rutgers University Press, 2008), In the Limelight and Under the Microscope (Bloomsbury, 2011), and New Constellations (MIT Press, 2012), among others. She has also presented on law and cinema at the Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities and the Society for Cinema and Media Studies.


Hokyu Hwang

Hokyu Hwang

Hokyu Hwang

November 2022 - December 2022

Hokyu Hwang is an Associate Professor at the School of Management and Governance at The University of New South Wales. He holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University. Previously, he taught at the University of Alberta School of Business and in Stanford University’s Department of Sociology.

Hwang’s research explores the concept and implication of the “rights of nature.” Hwang writes, “This increasing empirical phenomenon—the construction of nonhuman entities as legal persons (such as rivers, mountains, lakes, and even the planet itself) is not only fascinating but has theoretical implications for scholars of organizations, particularly those of us working in the neoinstitutional tradition.” Hwang aims to expand his research on the construction of actors and to study those efforts as instances of institutional change.

He is a coeditor of Agents, Actors, and Actorhood: Institutional Perspectives in the Nature of Agency, Action, and Authority (Emerald Publishing, 2019), and Globalization and Organization: World Society and Organizational Change (Oxford University Press, 2006). His writing has also been featured in the Academy of Management Review and the International Public Management Journal, among others. He was also awarded research grants from the National Research Foundation of Korea from 2014 to 2016 and 2018 to 2021.


Rahim Kurwa

Rahim Kurwa

Rahim Kurwa

September 2022 - August 2023

Rahim Kurwa is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Justice and the Department of Sociology at the University of Illinois Chicago. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Kurwa’s research is focused on how municipalities use policing to reproduce racial segregation in an era governed by fair housing law. His work explores the history and consequences of the policing of subsidized housing, and the work of tenants and legal advocates to resist that policing. He is currently writing a manuscript exploring these topics, titled Apartheid’s Afterlives: Policing Black Life in the Antelope Valley.

Kurwa’s work appears in numerous academic publications, including City and Community, Du Bois Review, Feminist Formations, Housing Policy Debate, and Surveillance and Society. In 2018, Kurwa served as the California Poverty and Socioeconomic Inequality Fellow with the Blum Initiative on Global and Regional Poverty at the University of California, Riverside. Kurwa now serves as the Chair of the Poverty, Class, and Inequality Division of the Society for the Study of Social Problems.


Michelle Oberman

Michelle Oberman

Michelle Oberman 

June 2022 - August 2022

Michelle Oberman is the Katharine and George Alexander Professor of Law at Santa Clara University School of Law. She received her J.D. and M.P.H. from the University of Michigan. Oberman is an award-winning scholar on the legal and ethical issues surrounding adolescence, pregnancy, and motherhood. She works at the intersection of health and criminal law, and her research explores both domestic and international issues.

Oberman’s recent scholarship focuses on the regulation of abortion across nations with divergent legislative strategies. She is the author, most recently, of Her Body, Our Laws: On the Frontlines of the Abortion War, from El Salvador to Oklahoma (Beacon Press, 2018), which explores the consequences of the total abortion ban in El Salvador and the potential implications of a similar ban in the United States. Her other books include When Mothers Kill: Interviews from Prison (New York University Press, 2008) and Mothers Who Kill Their Children: Understanding the Acts of Moms from Susan Smith to the “Prom Mom” (NYU Press, 2001). Her work is also featured in numerous journals and edited volumes, most recently in the Wisconsin Journal of Law, Gender and Society, and The Oxford Handbook of Feminist and Law in the United States.


Tyler Wall

Tyler Wall

Tyler Wall

June 2022 - July 2022

Tyler Wall is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Tennessee. He received his Ph.D. at Arizona State University and taught previously at Eastern Kentucky University and Indiana University Southeast.

Wall’s research explores the political and cultural economies of racialized state violence with a focus on the disorganizing violence of police power. His work has been published in a wide range of scholarly journals such as Theoretical Criminology; Crime, Media, Culture; American Quarterly; Radical Philosophy; Antipode; and Social Justice; among others. He is the coauthor of Police: A Field Guide (Verso Books, 2018) and coeditor of two collections, Violent Order: Essays on the Nature of Police (Haymarket Books, 2022) and Destroy, Build, Secure: Readings on Pacification (Red Quill Books, 2017).

Wall’s visiting scholarship period includes work on a forthcoming book with Haymarket Books, coauthored with Bill McClanahan, which explores the ways contemporary rank-and-file police culture justifies, normalizes, and celebrates power over life and death in cultural artifacts like challenge coins, t-shirts, memoirs,  and short stories.

 

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