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John Hagan, American Bar Foundation Research Professor Is Elected To The American Academy Of Arts And Sciences

May 3, 2010, Press releases

-FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE-

CONTACT: LUCINDA UNDERWOOD
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JOHN HAGAN, AMERICAN BAR FOUNDATION RESEARCH PROFESSOR IS ELECTED TO THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

 

CHICAGO, IL – MAY 3, 2010-American Bar Foundation research professor John Hagan, Co-recipient of the 2009 Stockholm Prize in Criminology, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Hagan is among a group of 229 elected to the 2010 class of new Fellows, to be inducted in a ceremony on October 9 at the Academy’s headquarters in Cambridge, MA. The American Academy of Arts and Sciences is an independent policy research center that conducts multidisciplinary studies of complex and emerging problems. The Academy’s elected members are leaders in the academic disciplines, the arts, business, and public affairs.

Hagan, who holds a joint appointment  at the ABF and as the John D. MacArthur Professor of Sociology and Law at Northwestern University, is also the Co-director of the Center on Law and Globalization.

Hagan  received Stockholm Prize in Criminology for his pathbreaking research on genocide in the Balkans and Darfur.  Using systematic methods of estimating deaths from surveys administered by nongovernmental organizations and the U.S. State Department, Hagan led research studies that found that widely circulated murder estimates in the tens of thousands in Darfur should have been in the hundreds of thousands.

He is the co-author of Darfur and the Crime of Genocide with Wenona Rymond-Richmond(Cambridge University Press 2009), which received the American Sociological Association Crime, Law and Deviance Section's Albert J. Reiss Distinguished Publication Award and the American Society of Criminology's Michael J. Hindelang Book Award.

His book, Justice in the Balkans (University of Chicago Press, 2003) is a social history of the international tribunal where Slobodan Milosevic, the late Serbian leader, was tried for war crimes for his role in the wars in Croatia, Bosnia, and Kosovo.  Hagan also studies the impact of youth crime on society and its links to childhood poverty. Hagan’s research interests also include the sociology of the legal profession. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Alberta, Canada.

Hagan joins four American Bar Foundation colleagues who hold memberships in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences: John Comaroff, James Heckman, Bonnie Honig, and Steven Levitt.

 

The American Bar Foundation is the nation’s leading research institute for the empirical study of law.  An independent, nonprofit organization, for more than fifty years the ABF has advanced the understanding and improvement of law through research projects of unmatched scale and quality on the most pressing issues facing the legal system in the United States and the world.

 

 

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